Better World Arts

Better World Arts Cushion - Amari Tjalkuri - AMT725

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  • Better World Arts Cushion - Amari Tjalkuri - AMT725
  • Better World Arts Cushion - Amari Tjalkuri - AMT725

Better World Arts

Better World Arts Cushion - Amari Tjalkuri - AMT725

Sold out
Better World Arts Cushion by Amari Tjalkuri

This traditional Kashmiri handicraft vitally supplements an often fluctuating rural income. Wool is custom dyed to match the original artist's image and hand stitched onto a cotton base. Each cushion is backed with natural coloured cotton canvas, and closes with a zip.

Comes with cushion insert.

Dimensions: 60 x 60cm

'WALKA' by Amari Tjalkuri. Artists from across the APY Lands have become well known for painting walka, a semi-abstract style of painting. Artists from across the APY Lands have become well known for painting walka, a semi-abstract style of painting. Walka describes any meaningful mark or pattern that is painted on the body during inma (ceremony), on rocks or cave walls, and drawn into the sand in a storytelling game known as milpatjunani. Amari's describes her painting Ngayuku Walka. Minyma tjuta nyinanyi pititjara. My design is many woman sitting with their piti's (bowls). The introduction of the new medium of sand, paired with a more simple compositional direction, meant the artists translated their stories in a more abstracted way, resulting in a 'floating' and more organic outcome. Amari's strong sense of design is evident in her series of sand paintings. Amari's describes her painting Ngayuku Walka. Minyma tjuta nyinanyi pititjara. My design is many woman sitting with their piti's (bowls). The introduction of the new medium of sand, paired with a more simple compositional direction, meant the artists translated their stories in a more abstracted way, resulting in a 'floating' and more organic outcome. Amari's strong sense of design is evident in her series of sand paintings.

Better World Arts work with a variety of indigenous Arts centres around Australia.
Focusing on fine art instead of predictable commercialised Aboriginal images, this cross-cultural collaboration uses the powerful images from the artists of the APY Lands and the traditional cultural craft heritage of the Kashmir region.
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